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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 348 (some duplicates have been removed)
to have political compromise. and, of course, the economies in north africa have a series of problems, there are short-term crises, but there are also long-term vulnerabilities that previous governments found enormously difficult to address and that current governments, even more fragile than their predecessors at the current time, often find even more difficult to address. at the same time, we look out at the region, we see untapped potential. we see the region not as the source for global energy supplies, but also new markets, investment in regional trade, and what we have assembled here is what i think is a rather remarkable list of people to help walk us through both where we are and where we might go. speaking first, dr. care line freund the chief economist for the middle east and africa at the world bank. she previously worked at the international monetary fund and the federal reserve where she focused on economic growth, international trade and international finance in the developing world and transition countries. after her, dr. nabli is the former governor of the central bank
to be with us today, if there were an all-star game for north africa experts, he would be seeing them play today and i think we are all delighted we are able to pull that together. for several years we have csis have tried to push forward the ideas that the maghreb is an important region or u.s. national and just and for u.s. strategic thinking. for several years we hurt held a roundtable and this is the fourth all-day conference on the north african region in the last five years. for years as well north africans remained on the margins of the u.s. strategic thinking but today's conference and the crowd we expect to be here suggest this is beginning to change. it's hard to look seriously at the middle east for the last 18 months and not conclude that north africa is indeed important and we need to understand it better. we approached these issues with mixed emotions. ambassador chris stevens was a friend and colleague and his tragic death in libya a month ago is a reminder not only of the dangers posed by hatred but also of the threat that comes in the wake of police forces in disarray, inadequat
was ever in, you know, certainly in libya or north africa -- >> chad. >> chad, excuse me, you're right. >> okay. >> he was charge in lebanon in the '80s? >> i have to tell you, i should have, but i did not bring his bio down here with me, but i will check on that. >> have a shortage of young foreign service officers, maybe -- [inaudible] wasn't quite effective? >> i would say on the contrary, given the great change and the huge relationships that we have with these countries of north africa and the middle east our younger folks are more and more gravitating to want to serve in that area to take that, to learn the languages. but as you know, at the senior level particularly in a complex time you need that seasoned leadership. please. >> can we stay on libya? >> uh-huh. >> is there any possibility or any expectation that he might ultimately be nominated to serve as ambassador, or is he regarded as an interim choice? >> well, he's the charge at the moment with regard to any white house plans to nominate a successor to ambassador stevens. i'm going to send you to the white house. >> did he
at a conference on north africa, hosted by the center for strategic and international studies. this is about 40 minutes. >> been none of are very hard. the first job is i want to welcome my friends, the investors morocco and algeria and the moroccan league. after a keynote address is done if you all remain in your seats to help get the party out of the room and my third task is to introduce somebody who probably needs less of an introduction than anybody in washington, general brent scowcroft is a legend in washington and is a retired lieutenant general in the air force national security visor to president gerald ford and george h. w. bush and a graduate of west point and holds a ph.d. from columbia. i think for all of us who worked with him he is a model of judgment and probity here in washington. user counselor and it's my pleasure to introduce general brent scowcroft to introduce our speaker. thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. this is a real pleasure for me to be able to stand here for john hamre and introduce our speaker today. is a testament to the importance of north africa to globa
to the it is status quo. it'll be this big, glaring absence in north africa. the largest country in africa disengages from the international community, solutions to the instability that dr. zoubir mentioned, solutions to the instability in sir car or northern -- syria or northern mali. what would make this all the more glaring is if our worst fears about libya were to come to pass. as i mentioned before, the libyan government is very much committed to the road map they've laid out, they're very committed to the political process, but i'd like to bring you back to the middle of 2011. at the time, gadhafi's head of external security defected. and when he defected, he warned that libya would become like somalia. and at the time i think most frames of references were to mogadishu, to a black hawk down moment. and, unfortunately, we have had a black hawk down moment in benghazi. but i think he's, you know, a are nuanced guy. and what i think he was referring to was a much broader frame of reference. how would libya look like somalia. not just a black hawk down incident, not just a benghazi incident, but o
, the fighting in somalia, rolling on the border between libya and most north africa countries, definitely that is going to be attack and criticize some o maybe the attitude was ts is not al qaeda because al qaeda is on the path of decline proving that is not true. ashley: can we ever defeat al qaeda in a region so violently unstable? >> keep in mind there is a dividing line between christians and muslims. you have in nigeria a good example of all the terrible atrocities and violence taking place along that line, but it begins in somalia and goes all the way to the west coast. all of these are being outfitted with a large degree by the weapons they stole out of libya. every indication over the last two years, especially since we went into and helped defeat qadhafi, things have gone in a very bad direction. you think yemen is bad, wait until you see what happens in north africa unless we get serious about this catastrophe. ashley: do you think the obama administration is getting serious about north africa? >> they better be serious because as the kernel has said, if we look at the map, al q
like terrorist group operating in north africa, and the significance of that is, of course, that al qaeda in a sense moved from pakistan to yemen, from yemen to north africa, so we have al qaeda spreading instead of being destroyed in another part of the world. so it's going to be interesting to talk to this guy. if, in fact, he gives up details and admits to being a member of al qaeda in the magnificent red. >> what do you make of whether the fbi or cia is the one who is interrogating or questioning this person? >> i think it's a good idea. the fbi is good at this. >> you prefer the fbi do it? >> much better. i think the renditions and interrogation tactics, the interrogation tactics work. i disagree with a lot of my colleagues, the fbi has done a good job. they always take investigations like this. american citizens were killed. your hon under american law, they should do it. >> they also believe another al qaeda avilleiated group had a role. >> al qaeda in iraq. that would be significant. >> not in this attack. >> exactly. >> we know there is a core group of the a dozen of people
that al-qaeda is stronger in north africa today than it was four years ago? >> absolutely. they have all kinds of new organizations. >> so it suggests that the white house doesn't get it. >> the problem is, they are avoiding reality, bad things happen when you avoid reality and we have just seen that. >> we are in a stronger position today than we were four years ago. >> t.j. crowley assistant secretary of state believes that president's anti-terrorism policies are paying off. >> we have gone through a dramatic transition, call it the arab spring. these transitions of repudiation that every bin laden stood for and tried to achieve through violent means. >> he says you don't make americans safer with words that inflame. you do it by winning over those we can work with. >> we are at the stage where we need partnerships to solve any meaningful crisis around the world. united states can't do that alone. >> do you believe there is dead americans as a result of this administration's roughly to call the threat what it is? >> i do. showing signs of weakness, they take that as an opportunity and
. we are talking about a military-like terrorist group operating in north africa. and the significance of that is of course that al qaeda in a sense moved from pakistan to yemen and from yemen to north africa. so we have al qaeda is spreading rather than, you know, being destroyed in another part of the world. so it's going to be interesting to talk to this guy. if, in fact, he gives up details if he admits to being a member of al qaeda in the maghreb. >> what do you make of whether the fbi or cia is the one who's interrogating or questioning this person? >> oh, i think it's a good idea. the fbi is good at this. they -- >> you prefer the fbi do it? >> much better. i mean, i just -- i think that the renditions and interrogation tactics, rough interrogation tactics ultimately didn't work. i disagree with a lot of my colleagues. the fbi does a good job on this. they've always taken priems mac investigations like this. american citizens were killed. under american law they're the ones that should be doing it. >> u.s. intelligence agencies now also believe another al qaeda affiliated group
in a sense moved from pakistan to yemen and from yemen to north africa. we have al qaeda spreading rather than being destroyed in another part of the world. it is going to be interesting to talk about this guy. if he admits to being a member of al qaeda. >> what do you make of whether the fbi or the cia is questioning this person? >> i think it is a good idea. >> you prefer the fbi in. >> much better. i think that the renditions and ininterrogation tactics didn't work. i disagree with a lot of my colleagues. the fbi does a good job on this. american citizens were killed under american law they are the ones that should be doing it. another group had a role in this. >> one we haven't heard of yet. that would be significant. >> we hadn't heard of them yet in this attack. >> we know that they are a group of a dozen people who launched the first attack. >> and for a long time we have been hearing that they were affiliated with al qaeda and we are hearing that they may have affiliation was al qaeda in iraq. over the weekend there was an attack in jordan and one of the targets in that attack was
with that the constant flow of migrants from africa north and all the trafficking that goes with it. i mean, the numbers in morocco in just the numbers of people coming through seeking refugee status, seeking to get to europe, and they're hiding in the forests, and they're sent back to the algerian border. i mean, country by country, region by region you've got flows of population as significant and as destabilizing as the refugee flows. so we've got really significant problems, and all of the sort of -- this is the bad side. i usually talk about inform -- in this case all this black economy is mixed in with these people flows, and the results can be quite nefarious. but let me just conclude by saying one thing. we do in washington with our kind of 9/11 prism tend to, i think, overemphasize counterterrorism at the expense of other things. and the u.s.' counterterrorism policies in north africa are highly unpopular. so we need to get better and smarter about how we do counterterrorism, and i think a big piece of it is economic. counterterrorism, i don't know how much it's shifted because they were really
secret meetings about the growing threat of al qaeda in north africa. we'll look at how serious that threat is. >>> a fight against al qaeda has the u.s. increasingly focused on north africa. "the washington post" reports the white house has been holding secret meetings to examine this threat and considers for the first time to launch unilateral strikes in the region. peter, you know the area very well. we've seen mali, tunisia, library area lot of problems developing with al qaeda and terrorists. do you believe that the administration is now looking at that area in a very different way and that there's an increased threat? >> reporter: well, "the washington post" piece certainly indicates that there's been secret meetings to kind of consider the possibility of strikes in the region and i think that sort of speaks for itself. the administration doesn't want to be caught flat footed as it was with al qaeda in the arabian pen and christmas day 2009 attack that was traced back to al qaeda in the arabian peninsula. arguing against this, al qaeda hasn't really shown any real ability
in the attack. before last month's attack in benghazi special teams arrived throughout north africa. they were positioned to quickly strike a terrorist target or rescue a hostage. anonymous counter terrorism official said they were not ready to respond. u.s. and mexican authorities are searching for suspects in the murder of a u.s. border patrol agent. nicholas ivie was responding to an alarm in a heavily trafficked drug corridor. he was shot to death and another agent was wounded. it's the first fatal shooting of a border agent since 2010. authorities believe more than one person fired on the agents. >>> american airlines says improperly installed seat clamps is the reason why seats came loose. american is inspecting their seats. the clamps that have been incorrectly installed. four other planes have had the same problem. in past week rows of seats have come loose during three american flights. federal aviation officials are investigating. cbs money watch time on a wednesday. car sales shift into high gear and an iphone case that can take a licking. ashley morrison has more. good morning. >>
. we knew very quickly what kind of incident we faced. we had been tracking al-qaeda in north africa. this was in attention by the administration and a later effort to spin it in a way that was political convenient by blaming the video instead of the rise of extremism there. >> and throwing the intelligence community over the side is politically a pretty risky strategy in the past for political leaders. >> i would, but i would say it's a piece with the obama-biden strategy. he said right there we didn't know. by we he means the vice president and the president. it's of a piece, paul, what they said about the recession and the economy. obama said the economy wasn't my fault, george bush did it. and now joe biden is saying we didn't know, the intelligence community didn't tell us. they have this instinct not to take responsibility at all for any serious event. >> there were requests put in to the state for more security because they were very worried things were getting to the of control in libya this year. >> does that mean there's a fisher here between secretary of state clinton's st
for north africa. this is 40 minutes. >> none of them are very hard. the first job is i want to welcome my friends and ambassadors. we honored that you came to join us today. second i want to ask after our keynote address is done, you all remain in your seats to help get the party out of the room. and my third task is to introduce somebody who needs less of an introduction than anybody in washington. general brother croft is national security advice tor to ford and bush. a graduate of west point. i think for all of us who have worked with him he's a model of judgment here in washington. he's a counselor and trustee of crirks is and i introduce general to introduce our keynote speaker. thank you. >> good afternoon. it's a real pleasure for me to be able to stand here for jon and introduce our speaker today. it's a testimony to the importance of north africa, to global security that the secretary of state has taken time to address this conference oh on the ma grab in transition. the forces that are surged through the arab world right now had many of their origins and some of the most promisi
bridges between the yiet, north africa and the middle east. >>> the family of a teenager shot and killed by police rallied on the steps of the da's office today. allen blooper's mother says he will not rest. >> why did you do this? you should be held accountable. this will not go on in our community. >> the alameda county district attorney says he will not prosecute officer miguel for the shooting death. he shot and killed him after mae 6th. the de tails of this case have been in dispute. officers contend the shooting was justified while his family says he was racially profiled. >>> firefighters in san francisco estimate a four alarm fire caused more than $7 million in damage. the early morning fire last friday destroyed a restaurant on the corner of west portal. it also damage add wine bar and a dentist office. the cause of the fire remains under investigation but the fire chief says it does not appear to be suspicious. >>> more than 300 employees of yosemite national park are being asked to give blood to help researchers better understand the potentially deadly hantavirus. six others g
traveled to north africa as peace corps engineer. i worked as an english teacher in morocco two years and quickly grew to love this part of the world. since joining the service i spent almost my entire career in middle east and africa. one of the things that impressed me were people old enough to have lived and traveled in the united states when we had closer relations. those days are back. we had 1,700 libyans apply for fullbright grants to study in the united states this year, more than any other country in the world. we know that libya is still recovering from an intense period of conflict. there are many courageous libyans who bear the scars of that battle. we are happy we have been able to treat some of your war wounded at u.s. hospitals. we look forward to building partnerships between american and libyan hospitals to help return libya's healthcare system to the extraordinary standards of excellence it once enjoyed. over my shoulder here you can see the u.s. capitol building. in that building 535 elected representatives from every corner of america come together to debate the is
. >> the desert tech project would see solar energy produced in north africa and exported to europe. according to a german newspaper, a treaty could be signed by early next year. the first solar farm would be built in morocco. >> could the saharan son soon be powering european cities -- the saharan sun? it could be home to a large new solar farm with the capacity of 150 megawatts. that is just one part of europe's vision to get renewable energy from africa. german-led consortium does it take wants to provide 50% of europe's energy by 2015, using wind and solar energy -- german- led consortium desert-tech. it is hoped that current negotiations could provide a breakthrough, paving the way for plants not only in morocco, but also tunisia, algeria, and other countries. the biggest question is funding. companies would take on around 200 million euros of the investment. another 400 million could come from national governments involved as well as eu funds. >> certainly an ambitious but impressive project. that is it for now. thanks for watching. >> do not forget, you can find more on our website at d
to mount an invasion of north africa from brazil. not only that, she is a ruthless hotel investor with no respect for anti-trust laws. as well as an unlicensed surgeon responsible for hundreds of botched wish bone removals. so do the right thing, maine, and defeat this dangerous assassin. because in this country, we believe that if you are's good at killing people over the internet, you should not be holding public office, you should be flying a drone. we'll be right back. (cheers and applause) >> stephen: welcome back, everybody. my guest tonight is a former astronaut whose new children's book is titled mousetronaut. i think is about a before who becomes a fireman. please welcome mark kelly. (cheers and applause) hey, mark, good to see you again. sit down. >> thank you. >> all right. a we are friend it, well-known to my viewers. were a navy captain. >> yes. >> stephen: you commanded the final mission of the spatialcious ellen defer. you flew 39 combat missions, the first iraq war. you're also the husband of gabbie giffords. how is she doing? >> she is doing great. we recently mov
the whole of middle east and north africa together. there are really serious issues because obviously the muslim brotherhood are the best organized political force in many of these countries, the only organized political force. >> rose: muti and miliband when we continue. fundin for arlirose was provided by the following. >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. rose. >> rose: riccardo muti is here, he is one of the world's great conductors and led some of the best orchestras, including the vienna philharmonic, he is currently music director o director of the chicago symphony orchestra, critics and audiences alike have been dazed and charmed which the intensity, the technique, the emotion that he and his musicians bring. here is a look at a performance of verdi requiem. ♪ .. ♪ ♪ >> rose: muti and the chicago symphony orchestra in new york, to open the season at carnegie hall on october 3rd, they are performing orff's carmina burana, i am happy to have mastery i are
and others in the middle east and of course north africa. >>shepard: i guess a concern that a pattern could be developing here. this could be coordinated. >>jonathan: certainly that is something that officials will want to look into. there is certainly an emergeing pattern of attacks in yemen against officials including the attack on the u.s. embassy. it is worth noting this is the one month mark since the attack on u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. that may or may not be significant. the state department spokeswoman said she could not say whether there is any significance. after the attack on the consulate in libya, there was an attack on the u.s. embassy in yemen. that is when the u.s. as you mentioned sent in that contingent of 50 marines to increase the security. those marines coincidentally, were due to be pulled out of yemen today. we have asked the pentagon and the state department if that has actually happened or is going to happen or whether in the light of today's attack those marines may now be left there to a good bit longer. we will health you know when we get an answer. >>she
in benghazi than she does and the growing strength of extremist in north africa is a threat to national security of the united states. >> last month's violence revealed strains of extremism that threaten the nations as well as the broader region and even the united states. >>reporter: the secretary of state said diplomacy can only be practiced by being on the ground. >> the united states will not retreat. we will keep leading. well stay engageed including in the hard places of the world, hard places where america's interests and values are at stake. that's who we are. that is the best way to honor those whom we have lost. >>reporter: what i didn't hear was the secretary of state mentioned by name, al qaeda or the group that is a like-minded group in north africa blamed for the attack at the consulate. >>trace: you learned new information of the video that was taken from the consulate. what do we know? >>reporter: new details confirmed of the security camera video recovered from benghazi showing there was no demonstration when the attack unfolded at 9:23 p.m. the surveillance video is c
of eleanor roosevelt who held the title for only 13 years. as america continues to engage in north africa, we have been extremely fortunate to be served by a public servant. clinton engage in these challenges day in and day out and cares deeply about the issues and how they affect america's interests and the leaves in an even brighter future for the people of the middle east. please join me in welcoming secretary of state, the hon. hillary rodham clinton. [applause] >> thank you. thank you all. thank you very much. and a special word of thanks to a friend and someone who i admire greatly, general snowcroft. his many years of distinguished service to our country is a great tribute in every respect. thanks also to john alterman and csis for hosting this conference on maghreb transition and seeking stability in an era of uncertainty. i wish to acknowledge dr. tehrat for his involvement in this important conference and members of the diplomatic corps as well. what are we here? why is this conference so timely? to start with, what happens in this dynamic region has far reaching consequences for o
think al-qaeda looks like today, especially in north africa? >> it's much stronger. it is spreading out. >> no question in your mind that al-qaeda is stronger in north africa today than it was four years ago? >> absolutely. all kind of new franchise operations. >> benghazi attack and the administration's reaction to it, suggests to goss that this white house doesn't get it. >> the problem is they are avoiding reality. bad things happen when you avoid reality. unfortunately we have just seen that. >> we are in a stronger position today than four years ago. >> p.y. crowley for public affairs under president obama believe the policies are paying off; particularly, in libya. we have gone through a dramatic transition, you know, called the arab spring. the transition to democracy are repudiation of everything that bin laden stood for. and tried to achieve through violent means. >> crowley says you don't make americans safer with words that inflame. you do it by winning over those we can work with. >> at the stage where we need parter inship to solve any meaningful crisis around the world. th
, especially in north africa, a shift that may be changing the way president obama campaigns. here he was a week ago. >> and today, al-qaida is on the run. >> reporter: but yesterday, that changed. in two speeches, he has now dropped his usual line that al- qaida is on the run. >> i said we focus on the terrorists who attacked us on 9/11, and we have and bin laden is dead. >> reporter: the change comes as both candidates prepare for their last debate next week, where the focus will be on foreign policy. mitt romney hoping to chip away at an issue that most polls show favors the president. >> i look at what's happening throughout the middle east, and pakistan and i look around north africa, and north malawi taken by an al-qaida affiliate and the world continues to be dangerous. >> this as the campaigns continue to argue about the terror attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi last month and what role al-qaida may have played. you can bet both issues will be coming up in the next debate. >> let me ask you a quick question, , what do we know about the suspect? any clues as to his motiva
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 348 (some duplicates have been removed)

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